Circe

I loved Circe.

I saw the beautiful cover all over Instagram, and heard all about the pricing snafu on a Book Riot podcast, so I ordered it in my Book of the Month box. Typically, a book about mythology is not in my wheelhouse, but maybe I need to change my tune. Or, maybe I am just a big Madeline Miller fan.

This book is follows the life of Circe, daughter of a god and a nypmh. Her father is Helios, god of the sun. She is her parent’s first child, and is considered strange from the beginning of her life. She is dedicated to her father as a child, but also has a will of her own. You are introduced to many of the Greek gods and mythological characters, but their power and the lure of their stories does not overpower the story of Circe.

I spent most of my time with this book outside, enjoying the spring/early summer weather and a drink. It was hard to put this book down, and I couldn’t wait to get back to it each time.

Pick this one up if you haven’t!

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Forward: A Memoir

I spent the last two days reading Forward: A Memoir by Abby Wambach. Like much of the world, I really got into women’s soccer for the past few World Cups and Summer Olympics. Part of the reason was watching Abby play. It was always so amazing to see her score goals with her face.

I did not know a ton about her personally, but remember hearing a few things when she got married (then, where did her wife go?, wait, now she’s married to Glennon Doyle?…this was my chain of thoughts when I was trying to figure this all out). My best friend read this book, and she never reads, so I thought I should get my hands on it.

My best friend and I both agreed – this book made us sad. It was sad that, while the entire world watched, Abby was not in love with the sport like we all thought she was – she was in love with the attention and the love of others that came to her through the sport. I did not know about her addiction struggles, or why her wife disappeared one day. This book was an interesting insight into how Abby felt in the highs and lows of her career, and how she, like all of us, had to come to terms with who she was and what she needed in order to continue moving forward (ha! see what I did there).

I did wish that there was some more reflection on events and why she behaved how she did instead of pushing along to the next story. I do recommend this book, though. It was an easy read that held my attention, and lead to some personal reflection.

The Mothers

I finished The Mothers by Brit Bennett on New Years Eve, but had to wait to do a post because it was also someone’s Christmas gift (oops), and I had to send it to them.

I heard all of the hype about The Mothers on all kinds of podcasts and book recommendation lists over the past year. I completely understand why! It has been a long time since I devoured a book like this. I loved Nadia. She’s not perfect, she has regrets, but she also keeps moving forward.

Nadia is struggling with her mother’s suicide and her relationships. She is angry. She falls for the pastor’s son, and Nadia finds herself in a situation where she has to make decisions on her own, and without support. This decision stays with her and impacts her decisions for years.

I loved the gossipy group of the church Mothers who narrate this book like a Greek Chorus. Pick this one up if you haven’t yet!

 

Heartburn

It is freezing here. We got nailed with snow the past few days, and the warmest weather we have had in about a week has been 12 degrees. So, tonight I curled up on the couch and finished Heartburn by Nora Ephron.

This book is about Rachel, a woman who has learned that her husband is having an affair. To make matters more complicated, they have a very young son, and Rachel is seven months pregnant with baby #2. Rachel writes cookbooks, and the book, which is a letter written by her, is littered with the occasional recipe. Rachel is hilarious. Despite the sad events in her life, she drops in these laugh-out-loud moments.

This book pulled in two directions for me. First, it has the gossipy, Real Housewives vibe happening. Rachel gives you the gossip on each of the characters she introduces, and she starts some juicy rumors about the woman whom her husband has been sleeping with. In the other direction is Rachel reflecting on how she got to this point, and what she’s going to do from here. She really has to assess what will make her happy and how she can move forward from this point.

This book read quickly, was funny, and Rachel had a great voice. I really enjoyed this and may have to pick up another Ephron in my future.

The Night Circus

I took a one book break from my books-to-read-in-your-20s list to read The Night Circus by Erin Morgenstern. A friend has been telling me to read it for over a year, and she loaned it to me over the holidays. I cannot be more thankful!

It has been a long time since I devoured a book like I did with The Night Circus. It was so nice to sit down and read 100 pages at a time without realizing. It was so easy to get lost in Morgenstern’s world. If you’ve read any posts of mine before, you know that I love books that change perspective, and this book delivered in this area perfectly.

I don’t have some deep literary interpretations of this book – I can just say it was a lovely read with brilliant imagery inside a fantastical world. I did not expect to be drawn in so intensely. Don’t let the length of this book be intimidating because it was one of the quickest reads I’ve had in my hands in a very long time. If you’re one of the few people out there who has not read this book, bump it up to the top of your TBR!

The Moviegoer

It’s my final day off before I go back to work, so I took some time to finish The Moviegoer by Walker Percy. As with many of the books I have picked up in my books-to-read-in-your-20s challenge, I knew nothing about The Moviegoer or Walker Percy. This book actually won the National Book Award for Fiction.

This book follows a 29-year-old stockbroker named Binx who is living in New Orleans. He is searching for his place in the world, and he tells the reader about that search and how frustrating it is. Other central characters in this novel include Binx’s aunt and cousin, whom he is fond of and “close” to. As close as he can get without yet knowing his own place in the world, at least. Kate, Binx’s cousin, is severely depressed, and Binx is often asked to intervene and try to help pull her out of her episodes.

Binx is very particular and regimented. When describing himself he talks about how organized his wallet is, how he enjoys being a good citizen, and how his armpits never stink. He has a habit of dating his secretaries, and seems to hold most of his relationships at a distance. He loves attending movies, good or bad, and has particular theater employees whom he has developed comradeship with.

I’m 29, so I understand the familial pressures that Binx feels (people asking what you’re doing with your life, asking why you aren’t married, etc.), and it was interesting to see the differences in the way Binx and I live our lives. Ultimately, as Binx turns 30 there are pieces of his life that have come together and other pieces he still isn’t sure of. As 30 continues to loom closer for me, it’s a good reminder that I do not have to have everything aligned – I’ll always be seeking where I fit into the world in some facet.

Giovanni’s Room

Happy New Year! I hope that you all had a safe and lovely holiday, surrounded by family, friends, and food. I spent my NYE at home with my best friend and our dogs. We ate chili, played Skip-Bo, and watched all of the gossipy end-of-the-year shows. I was in bed by 12:07. It was wonderful.

I have finished my first book of 2017! I’m off to a good start. My first book of the year is Giovanni’s Room by James Baldwin. I am a fan of the Americans in Paris trying to figure out their lives concept, so this book really worked for me.

David is an American who has been living in Paris for some time. He is almost 30, and is wavering about his relationship with his girlfriend, Hella. He is also trying to sort out his sexuality as he starts a relationship with Giovanni, an Italian bartender. The book walks through David’s dilemma as he tries to figure himself out. You see the intensity of this relationship and how complicated it becomes as David reflects on the circumstances.

Baldwin does an excellent job of keeping the pages turning because he drops little clues through the book that something significant is coming (no spoilers!), and you have to keep reading to figure out where things really went wrong. This book is a quick, intense read, and I would highly recommend it!

Happy reading in 2017!